Dr. Tamara W. Dias is rerooted and thriving
8 min watch

Dr. Tamara W. Dias is rerooted and thriving

Cville
Dec 2
/
8 min watch


Destinee Wright: Hi, folks. I'm Destinee. I'm the owner of Destinee Marketing based in Charlotte, North Carolina.

And today we are bringing you a fantastic conversation with Dr. Tamara Dias, based in Charlottesville, Virginia. As the founder and CEO of TWD Coaching and Consulting, Dr. Tamara Dias has the goal of walking side by side with her clients to help them become their best selves. With over a decade of experience in K through 12 and higher education, she has coached and consulted with statewide and national organizations. Named to the Forbes 30 Under 30, Dr. Dias has committed herself to coaching individuals from all backgrounds to unlock their full potential.

Welcome Dr. Tamara Dias. 

Dr. Tamara W. Diaz:
Thank you so much.

Destinee: Tell us something unexpected that most people don't know about you. 

Tamara:
I think the biggest thing that most people don't know, probably until they get to know me a little bit better, is that I'm extremely introverted. People typically will see my social media or see a Reel that I've posted on Instagram and just assume that I tend to be extroverted because my business is very people facing, but I'm very introverted. I definitely prefer being alone most of the time, and whenever I'm around a lot of people, I have to take hours to recharge after the fact. 

Destinee:
I understand that. What's one thing you wish you had known when you began your business? 

Tamara:
For me, the biggest thing that I wish I had known was how much of a perfectionist I was going to be. One of the statistics that I read about mentioned that a lot of brand new business owners get stuck in the idea phase so much that they fail to actually put the idea into motion. And so they get so stuck in, "Is it perfect? Is it a hundred percent what it needs to be for the people?" instead of actually launching it and seeing what happens. And so I wish that I just told myself to just go for it a lot sooner versus trying to get stuck in these phases of trying to make everything perfect. before I launched it. 

Destinee:
Yes, perfectionism is definitely the enemy of progress. I run into that myself with my clients as well, and I really encourage people to release as much as they can. It's like with specifically video content for social media, as a social media manager, we know that video is king. 

Tamara:
Yeah. 

Destinee:
And I find that a lot of my clients really get stuck in this planning phase. Like, OK, well, we'll plan a week of Reels content, a week of TikTok content. And then when it comes down to the actual execution side, it's easy to get tripped up because we want things to be perfect. But perfection can come over time and maybe not at all. Right? It's OK to release that...

Tamara:
Right. 

Destinee
: ...because when you are putting your own authentic spin on something, it is good and it is good enough, right? 

Tamara:
Absolutely. 

Destinee:
Thank you so much for sharing that. What has been your biggest challenge over the last year, and what did you learn from it? 

Tamara:
My biggest challenge, for me, has been getting out of my own head. Kind of going back to that idea of not being a perfectionist when COVID hit, and I was trying to make sure that all of my services were set up to be virtual and I could work with people who weren't just based in my area, but statewide and nationwide. I found myself again, not only in that space of pausing before I launched, but then when things didn't go well, I kind of got really paralyzed. And then was like, "Well, it's not working, so I'm just going to stop." And so for me, the biggest challenge has been moving past obstacles and moving past challenges and just taking the information for what it is, as data. And being able to say, "Well, now that I have tried this new thing or I have tried this new Reel or this new video format and it didn't go as planned, how do I take that information and use it versus allowing it to kind of keep me stuck and feeling discouraged by it?" So that's been something that I've been working through over the past year and really just trying not to beat myself up about it. 

Destinee:
What are some of the best resources that have been helpful for you along the way? 

Tamara:
The biggest resource for me, especially what's been the most impactful, has been surrounding myself with other entrepreneurs. When I find myself in a rut where I can't get out of my own head, it's so important just to have people who are in a similar headspace who are in the day-to-day struggles of being an entrepreneur who understand how it feels. And for me, I also work a nine-to-five. So I try to surround myself with other entrepreneurs who are doing something similar because they understand what I'm going through. And that, for me, has been more helpful than a book or an article or anything, because having another human who I can just connect with and bounce ideas off of has been invaluable for me as a business owner. 

Destinee:
I do have a follow up question. So you mentioned that you were an introvert. As an introverted person, how are you able to step out of that space as an entrepreneur because networking is so important? How would you approach that or what advice do you have for someone who may be introverted as well and wants to connect with other entrepreneurs? 

Tamara:
Great question. I actually just did a podcast episode about this, so this is perfect. So one of the things that I do myself and I encourage all introverts to do is pace yourself. So I never try to fill my calendar up with a bunch of networking events. I'm very selective about the ones that I choose, and I try to make my attendance to these events very intentional. And so now most of them are virtual, and so they're not as draining on me as if I was going to, you know, a bunch of networking happy hours or lunch seminars. And so for me, I try to pick one or two that really align with my mission or my purpose. And then I'll set little markers for myself whenever I'm at an event. So I'll say, "Well, at this event, my goal is to meet three new people and connect with three new people." And just setting small goals like that just helps my brain not get overwhelmed and feel like, "Well, I have to meet thirty different people at once." As long as I've met my three to five, whatever number that I've set, I focus on that. It makes it seem less intimidating. And then I always structure an automatic recharge time. So I very rarely will schedule them back to back. And sometimes I'll schedule one on a Thursday and then another the following Monday because then I have time to kind of pause, reset and refresh. So just very intentional with how I schedule my networking opportunities and events and make sure I give myself time to rest. 

Destinee:
What was that podcast so we can definitely shout them out and connect folks, they can get some more insight. What was that podcast? 

Tamara:
Absolutely. So I launched the podcast a month ago and it's called Rerooted and Thriving, and it's a podcast focused on helping leaders lead authentically without hiding themselves in the workplace. And so I think it's my fifth or sixth episode where I talk to introverts specifically on how you can network and then how you can build your network in a remote setting. So highly suggest it. 



Destinee:
I love that. Congratulations on the launch of your podcast! 

Tamara:
Thank you. 

Destinee:
I am so excited for that. What advice would you give to someone wanting to pursue a career similar to yours? 

Tamara:
I think my biggest piece of advice would be don't be afraid to make mistakes. I guess that's the theme of what I've shared is you're going to make a lot of 'em. Entrepreneurship, I think, is, you know, you learn from trying things and messing them up or trying and doing them really well and figuring out what works for you. So don't be so afraid of messing up that you just kind of stay stuck where you are. I think every entrepreneur that I've talked to, who has seen any type of success in their business long term, has come from a series of, "Well, I tried this three times, got these results and really refined what worked for me." And so understanding that every single time you're trying something, you're getting better at it and you're refining it. And I would definitely encourage all entrepreneurs to approach it with that mindset. 

Destinee:
How can people support you right now? 

Tamara:
I definitely suggest checking out my podcast. It's on all platforms: Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts. Again, the name is Rerooted and Thriving. I launch a new episode every Thursday. And then, of course, follow me on social media, on Instagram @DrTamaraWDias. I'm always sharing tips and information there. And it's a great way to connect with me as well and share your journey with me. 

Destinee:
Thank you so much for joining us; I appreciate you. And definitely go check her out. She is a great follow! Thank you again so much. 

Tamara:
Absolutely. 

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Destinee Wright
Consultant, Social Media Marketer, Activist

Destinee is an artist, activist, and serial entrepreneur whose work centers on amplifying marginalized voices and impacting equity for racial and socioeconomic marginalized people. She currently works with small businesses and nonprofits to provide consulting services, content curation, and social media strategies that connect brands with their communities.

Dr. Tamara W. Dias is rerooted and thriving
8 min watch

Dr. Tamara W. Dias is rerooted and thriving

Cville
Dec 2
/
8 min watch


Destinee Wright: Hi, folks. I'm Destinee. I'm the owner of Destinee Marketing based in Charlotte, North Carolina.

And today we are bringing you a fantastic conversation with Dr. Tamara Dias, based in Charlottesville, Virginia. As the founder and CEO of TWD Coaching and Consulting, Dr. Tamara Dias has the goal of walking side by side with her clients to help them become their best selves. With over a decade of experience in K through 12 and higher education, she has coached and consulted with statewide and national organizations. Named to the Forbes 30 Under 30, Dr. Dias has committed herself to coaching individuals from all backgrounds to unlock their full potential.

Welcome Dr. Tamara Dias. 

Dr. Tamara W. Diaz:
Thank you so much.

Destinee: Tell us something unexpected that most people don't know about you. 

Tamara:
I think the biggest thing that most people don't know, probably until they get to know me a little bit better, is that I'm extremely introverted. People typically will see my social media or see a Reel that I've posted on Instagram and just assume that I tend to be extroverted because my business is very people facing, but I'm very introverted. I definitely prefer being alone most of the time, and whenever I'm around a lot of people, I have to take hours to recharge after the fact. 

Destinee:
I understand that. What's one thing you wish you had known when you began your business? 

Tamara:
For me, the biggest thing that I wish I had known was how much of a perfectionist I was going to be. One of the statistics that I read about mentioned that a lot of brand new business owners get stuck in the idea phase so much that they fail to actually put the idea into motion. And so they get so stuck in, "Is it perfect? Is it a hundred percent what it needs to be for the people?" instead of actually launching it and seeing what happens. And so I wish that I just told myself to just go for it a lot sooner versus trying to get stuck in these phases of trying to make everything perfect. before I launched it. 

Destinee:
Yes, perfectionism is definitely the enemy of progress. I run into that myself with my clients as well, and I really encourage people to release as much as they can. It's like with specifically video content for social media, as a social media manager, we know that video is king. 

Tamara:
Yeah. 

Destinee:
And I find that a lot of my clients really get stuck in this planning phase. Like, OK, well, we'll plan a week of Reels content, a week of TikTok content. And then when it comes down to the actual execution side, it's easy to get tripped up because we want things to be perfect. But perfection can come over time and maybe not at all. Right? It's OK to release that...

Tamara:
Right. 

Destinee
: ...because when you are putting your own authentic spin on something, it is good and it is good enough, right? 

Tamara:
Absolutely. 

Destinee:
Thank you so much for sharing that. What has been your biggest challenge over the last year, and what did you learn from it? 

Tamara:
My biggest challenge, for me, has been getting out of my own head. Kind of going back to that idea of not being a perfectionist when COVID hit, and I was trying to make sure that all of my services were set up to be virtual and I could work with people who weren't just based in my area, but statewide and nationwide. I found myself again, not only in that space of pausing before I launched, but then when things didn't go well, I kind of got really paralyzed. And then was like, "Well, it's not working, so I'm just going to stop." And so for me, the biggest challenge has been moving past obstacles and moving past challenges and just taking the information for what it is, as data. And being able to say, "Well, now that I have tried this new thing or I have tried this new Reel or this new video format and it didn't go as planned, how do I take that information and use it versus allowing it to kind of keep me stuck and feeling discouraged by it?" So that's been something that I've been working through over the past year and really just trying not to beat myself up about it. 

Destinee:
What are some of the best resources that have been helpful for you along the way? 

Tamara:
The biggest resource for me, especially what's been the most impactful, has been surrounding myself with other entrepreneurs. When I find myself in a rut where I can't get out of my own head, it's so important just to have people who are in a similar headspace who are in the day-to-day struggles of being an entrepreneur who understand how it feels. And for me, I also work a nine-to-five. So I try to surround myself with other entrepreneurs who are doing something similar because they understand what I'm going through. And that, for me, has been more helpful than a book or an article or anything, because having another human who I can just connect with and bounce ideas off of has been invaluable for me as a business owner. 

Destinee:
I do have a follow up question. So you mentioned that you were an introvert. As an introverted person, how are you able to step out of that space as an entrepreneur because networking is so important? How would you approach that or what advice do you have for someone who may be introverted as well and wants to connect with other entrepreneurs? 

Tamara:
Great question. I actually just did a podcast episode about this, so this is perfect. So one of the things that I do myself and I encourage all introverts to do is pace yourself. So I never try to fill my calendar up with a bunch of networking events. I'm very selective about the ones that I choose, and I try to make my attendance to these events very intentional. And so now most of them are virtual, and so they're not as draining on me as if I was going to, you know, a bunch of networking happy hours or lunch seminars. And so for me, I try to pick one or two that really align with my mission or my purpose. And then I'll set little markers for myself whenever I'm at an event. So I'll say, "Well, at this event, my goal is to meet three new people and connect with three new people." And just setting small goals like that just helps my brain not get overwhelmed and feel like, "Well, I have to meet thirty different people at once." As long as I've met my three to five, whatever number that I've set, I focus on that. It makes it seem less intimidating. And then I always structure an automatic recharge time. So I very rarely will schedule them back to back. And sometimes I'll schedule one on a Thursday and then another the following Monday because then I have time to kind of pause, reset and refresh. So just very intentional with how I schedule my networking opportunities and events and make sure I give myself time to rest. 

Destinee:
What was that podcast so we can definitely shout them out and connect folks, they can get some more insight. What was that podcast? 

Tamara:
Absolutely. So I launched the podcast a month ago and it's called Rerooted and Thriving, and it's a podcast focused on helping leaders lead authentically without hiding themselves in the workplace. And so I think it's my fifth or sixth episode where I talk to introverts specifically on how you can network and then how you can build your network in a remote setting. So highly suggest it. 



Destinee:
I love that. Congratulations on the launch of your podcast! 

Tamara:
Thank you. 

Destinee:
I am so excited for that. What advice would you give to someone wanting to pursue a career similar to yours? 

Tamara:
I think my biggest piece of advice would be don't be afraid to make mistakes. I guess that's the theme of what I've shared is you're going to make a lot of 'em. Entrepreneurship, I think, is, you know, you learn from trying things and messing them up or trying and doing them really well and figuring out what works for you. So don't be so afraid of messing up that you just kind of stay stuck where you are. I think every entrepreneur that I've talked to, who has seen any type of success in their business long term, has come from a series of, "Well, I tried this three times, got these results and really refined what worked for me." And so understanding that every single time you're trying something, you're getting better at it and you're refining it. And I would definitely encourage all entrepreneurs to approach it with that mindset. 

Destinee:
How can people support you right now? 

Tamara:
I definitely suggest checking out my podcast. It's on all platforms: Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts. Again, the name is Rerooted and Thriving. I launch a new episode every Thursday. And then, of course, follow me on social media, on Instagram @DrTamaraWDias. I'm always sharing tips and information there. And it's a great way to connect with me as well and share your journey with me. 

Destinee:
Thank you so much for joining us; I appreciate you. And definitely go check her out. She is a great follow! Thank you again so much. 

Tamara:
Absolutely. 

Destinee Wright
Consultant, Social Media Marketer, Activist

Destinee is an artist, activist, and serial entrepreneur whose work centers on amplifying marginalized voices and impacting equity for racial and socioeconomic marginalized people. She currently works with small businesses and nonprofits to provide consulting services, content curation, and social media strategies that connect brands with their communities.