Skapparoneday brought the noise to Westinster
3 MIN WATCH

Skapparoneday brought the noise to Westinster

Westminster
Mar 2
/
3 MIN WATCH

Back in 2016, Skapparoneday was bucking the trend. Rather than moving out to LA to find an audience, they took on the world from their comfort of their own hometown. "Westminster is this bubble," band member Najee Banks tell us, "and the internet is broadening the bubble completely."

Although the group has since disbanded, lets this video stand as a reminder that big things can come from the smallest places... and that punk rock never dies.

Photography by Ben Z. Cooper

Transcript

Paul Davis Griffin: Skapparoneday is where I'm taking all the skills that I learned from all the other places and putting them together in one kind of, like, resume piece.

Najee Banks: I've been teaching myself piano since I was seven, so music has been very prevalent. My dad's a music producer, so he kind of fed into me with, like, leaving his piano around and everything and me fiddling with that.

Ben Reiff: A big part of this band isn't just the music, it's the web series. And that's all about the stuff we put out on YouTube and just social media in general. I think we try and kind of see the whole picture, not just the music. Obviously the music is a fundamental part of it, but we kind of try and see our whole brand image and how we put that out there online.

Griffin: I think that from a creative standpoint, that the internet really just gives people an opportunity to do what they want to do. I think that anyone could go out and make a video and make a band or or a piece of art. But, what do you do with it? And now we have an opportunity to where anyone with a camera can, you know, make their movie or make their skit.

Banks: It definitely helps the process of getting the name out there and the message and the style and the image and the reason really for why we're doing this. Because we can we can post a tweet, one single tweet saying, you know, "Punk rock lives forever!" and then someone over in California, and someone in SoHo, and someone in South Africa, someone in Argentina, or someone in Australia sees that tweet and they're like, "Oh, man, I gotta start listening to some more punk rock!"

Samuel O'Farrel: We just had a show actually, where I was talking with one of my friends over the internet and he suggested it to a promoter. I had never even met this dude in real life. I had no clue who he was. I contacted him via Facebook Messenger and basically immediately got a response back. And we had a show this past Friday.

Griffin: The internet is my job. It's my competition. It's my marketplace. It's basically where I live nowadays.

Banks: With all these people that you see and that you know daily, there's only so much you can experience outside of that bubble. And so I think that's really where the the internet and Westminster comes into play is like, you know, Westminster is this bubble and the internet is broadening the bubble completely.

No items found.
Skapparoneday brought the noise to Westinster
3 MIN WATCH

Skapparoneday brought the noise to Westinster

Westminster
Mar 2
/
3 MIN WATCH

Back in 2016, Skapparoneday was bucking the trend. Rather than moving out to LA to find an audience, they took on the world from their comfort of their own hometown. "Westminster is this bubble," band member Najee Banks tell us, "and the internet is broadening the bubble completely."

Although the group has since disbanded, lets this video stand as a reminder that big things can come from the smallest places... and that punk rock never dies.

Photography by Ben Z. Cooper

Transcript

Paul Davis Griffin: Skapparoneday is where I'm taking all the skills that I learned from all the other places and putting them together in one kind of, like, resume piece.

Najee Banks: I've been teaching myself piano since I was seven, so music has been very prevalent. My dad's a music producer, so he kind of fed into me with, like, leaving his piano around and everything and me fiddling with that.

Ben Reiff: A big part of this band isn't just the music, it's the web series. And that's all about the stuff we put out on YouTube and just social media in general. I think we try and kind of see the whole picture, not just the music. Obviously the music is a fundamental part of it, but we kind of try and see our whole brand image and how we put that out there online.

Griffin: I think that from a creative standpoint, that the internet really just gives people an opportunity to do what they want to do. I think that anyone could go out and make a video and make a band or or a piece of art. But, what do you do with it? And now we have an opportunity to where anyone with a camera can, you know, make their movie or make their skit.

Banks: It definitely helps the process of getting the name out there and the message and the style and the image and the reason really for why we're doing this. Because we can we can post a tweet, one single tweet saying, you know, "Punk rock lives forever!" and then someone over in California, and someone in SoHo, and someone in South Africa, someone in Argentina, or someone in Australia sees that tweet and they're like, "Oh, man, I gotta start listening to some more punk rock!"

Samuel O'Farrel: We just had a show actually, where I was talking with one of my friends over the internet and he suggested it to a promoter. I had never even met this dude in real life. I had no clue who he was. I contacted him via Facebook Messenger and basically immediately got a response back. And we had a show this past Friday.

Griffin: The internet is my job. It's my competition. It's my marketplace. It's basically where I live nowadays.

Banks: With all these people that you see and that you know daily, there's only so much you can experience outside of that bubble. And so I think that's really where the the internet and Westminster comes into play is like, you know, Westminster is this bubble and the internet is broadening the bubble completely.

No items found.